bojandjordjevic:


Some of these Tumblr photos are pure art…. Appreciation for all these gorgeous photo.

bojandjordjevic:

Some of these Tumblr photos are pure art…. Appreciation for all these gorgeous photo.

bitchfaceart:

Louise-Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, Portrait of Madame Bilibin (C. 1800)

Brilliant. 

bitchfaceart:

Louise-Elisabeth Vigée-LebrunPortrait of Madame Bilibin (C. 1800)

Brilliant. 

manbartlett:

particleb0red:

manbartlett:

Required reading. 

Includes quotes from some of my biggest heroes in the art world today: William Powhida, Ed Winkleman and Magda Sawon. These folks, among a handful of others, continue to inspire me. Even in the bleakest of times. Which, truth be told, happens to be now. I haven’t had a sale in a while and am behind on every bill; more than usual. Which, as a full time time artist, tends to complicate my relationship to artistic creation and production. Exponentially. Still working my way through that one. In the meantime, you know, buy art! 20x200 is still down so you have no excuses! 

Related: I WILL NOT MAKE ANY MORE SELLABLE ART

make things because its like breathing, not solely for money or laurels.

Because it’s like breathing? That’s a little naive/dramatic. If you know anything about my work it should be pretty clear that money and laurels are tertiary influences at best in my practice. But I don’t shy away from talking about them openly and honestly. I’ve also made a career out of it. For better or worse. In my opinion we need more people talking about these issues and taking the related risks with the work. I also believe it can and should be supported, and I’ll fight for it any day of the week. Not just my own, but my peers too.

"I’ll tell you what I really think—in this climate, I’m pretty sure someone like Robert Rauschenberg could never have made it."—Magda Sawon

storyboard:

Ukiyo-e Heroes: Donkey Kong Visits 17th-Century Japan

Mario racing a rickshaw, Kirby wielding a katana, and Donkey Kong bounding past cherry blossoms. In his fantastical Ukiyo-e Heroes series, 29-year-old illustrator Jed Henry reimagines classic video game characters in the style, setting, and medium of traditional Japanese woodblock prints (ukiyo-e). Growing up in Indiana in the 1980s, Henry learned to draw by copying the art in his video game manuals. It was an exciting time to be a gamer, as companies like Nintendo and Sega raced to create the best systems and graphics. A decade later, with a degree in animation and living in Utah, the illustrator and children’s book author is working with Canadian (by way of Tokyo) printmaking master Dave Bull to to create fine art prints of his characters. With the help of a Kickstarter campaign — Henry raised $290,000 more than his original goal — his illustrations are celebrating Japan’s vibrant pop culture, both then and now. We talked to him about his craft.

How do you choose which video games to feature?

I’m a big retro gamer. I played a lot of games as a kid, and my heart is really stuck on those games — a lot of Nintendo, Konami, and Capcom titles. So, that’s how I choose, it’s just my favorites from when I was a kid.

Read More

jenbekmanprojects:


Autoportrait en poulpe, 2009 by David Favrod
An entrancing, sometimes hallucinatory collection of images, Gaijin is a tool in photographer David Favrod’s quest for identity.  The Second Edition 2012 Hot Shot and Aperture Portfolio Prize–winner has lived in Switzerland for most of his life, but was born in Japan to a Japanese mother and Swiss father; he created Gaijin after the Japanese embassy in Switzerland denied his citizenship request.  “The aim of this work is to create ‘my own Japan’ in Switzerland, from memories of my journeys when I was small, my mother’s stories, popular and traditional culture and my grandparents’ war narratives,” says Favrod.
See all of our Second Edition 2012 Hot Shots and learn more about the Hey, Hot Shot! photography competition. 

Mesmerizing. 

jenbekmanprojects:

Autoportrait en poulpe, 2009 by David Favrod

An entrancing, sometimes hallucinatory collection of images, Gaijin is a tool in photographer David Favrod’s quest for identity.  The Second Edition 2012 Hot Shot and Aperture Portfolio Prize–winner has lived in Switzerland for most of his life, but was born in Japan to a Japanese mother and Swiss father; he created Gaijin after the Japanese embassy in Switzerland denied his citizenship request.  “The aim of this work is to create ‘my own Japan’ in Switzerland, from memories of my journeys when I was small, my mother’s stories, popular and traditional culture and my grandparents’ war narratives,” says Favrod.

See all of our Second Edition 2012 Hot Shots and learn more about the Hey, Hot Shot! photography competition

Mesmerizing. 

jenbekmanprojects:


Untitled #6 by Jessica Bruah
What story does this image tell? Artist Jessica Bruah began her project Stories, from which this image is taken, as a way to merge her interests in writing and photography. “The work is influenced by the formal qualities of short fiction and its tendency to focus on a single mood or event,” says Bruah.
This enigmatic photograph contains elements that could be innocuous or sinister, depending on the tale created by the viewer. For what purpose will the gasoline can be used?
Prints of this edition begin at  $60. 

jenbekmanprojects:

Untitled #6 by Jessica Bruah

What story does this image tell? Artist Jessica Bruah began her project Stories, from which this image is taken, as a way to merge her interests in writing and photography. “The work is influenced by the formal qualities of short fiction and its tendency to focus on a single mood or event,” says Bruah.

This enigmatic photograph contains elements that could be innocuous or sinister, depending on the tale created by the viewer. For what purpose will the gasoline can be used?

Prints of this edition begin at  $60

explore-blog:

The Möbius structure of relationships, one of David Byrne’s hand-drawn pencil diagrams of the human condition
The Pyramids of Fashion and Satin Plains take up much larger regions of my heart map. The Mountains of Prudence, not so much. 
jenbekmanprojects:


A Map of the Open Country of a Woman’s Heart by D.W. Kellogg & Co.
Created by a Connecticut woman in the first half of the 19th century, this image reveals much about its era’s attitude toward women. Take a minute to inspect the map, which includes locales like the Pyramids of Fashion and Dandy’s Rest. And at the very center you’ll find its greatest region—the City and District of Love.  Learn more.
Prints begin at $60. See all of our choices for Valentine’s Day. 

The Pyramids of Fashion and Satin Plains take up much larger regions of my heart map. The Mountains of Prudence, not so much. 

jenbekmanprojects:

A Map of the Open Country of a Woman’s Heart by D.W. Kellogg & Co.

Created by a Connecticut woman in the first half of the 19th century, this image reveals much about its era’s attitude toward women. Take a minute to inspect the map, which includes locales like the Pyramids of Fashion and Dandy’s Rest. And at the very center you’ll find its greatest region—the City and District of Love.  Learn more.

Prints begin at $60. See all of our choices for Valentine’s Day

jenbekmanprojects:

City Lights United States of America and Black Marble (Asia) by 20x200 Artist Fund

Both of today’s releases are courtesy of the super-advanced cameras at NASA. For City Lights, they snapped the land mass from far above the continent, so all we can see are bright clusters illuminating our lives on one particular night. The result isn’t a country but a constellation in cobalt and gold, sturdy and fragile at once. The East burns with frenzied electricity; westward, there are expanses of open land seemingly asleep. Like a brightly lit bookend, a ribbon of light hugs the West Coast. Varied as it is, it is indeed one nation, floating in space, a collection of movie screens and smartphones and office buildings and flashlights under the covers in the dark.

For Black Marble (Asia), meanwhile, we seem to have zoomed up a level in the stratosphere. Here, the shapes of Asia’s nations glimmer from the darkened planetary surface, and a distant sun becomes a sliver of blue crescent. Together or separately, these editions are delicate, powerful reminders of the singularity of the planet and its disparate places. Read more.